PSA to hiring managers

Dear employers:

It’s really annoying when I carefully prepare a resume & cover letter only to find out right as I’m about to submit that you want a bunch of additional stuff from me, like ways I would improve your product, ideas for future projects, or a short essay to prove that I know something about the field this job is in. Writing samples are one thing, but you’re disrespecting my time when you put me in the position of unpaid consultant when we haven’t even met. This is also the wrong time for you to be asking me for my references. Learn better hiring practices, and you will probably improve your candidate pool.

Sincerely,
Vashti

Advertisements

From the archives

Here’s a post I wrote late last October, when I was in my receptionist job. I was working on perfecting this when I got laid off, at which point it seemed irrelevant. But I’m posting it now as a record of what that job was like.

I’m six weeks into my new job.

At first I was really happy: having a real job made me feel needed and valued, and it was really good for me to have a legitimate reason to get out every other day. I was no longer isolated and felt like I had a purpose, however minor my contribution.

Continue reading

My second phone interview

On Monday I interviewed with a second company. I did the set-up all right this time: asked who I would be interviewing with (ZC), and for how long (about 30 minutes). Incidentally, the admin assistant who was setting this up via email didn’t make it at all clear that it was going to be a phone interview rather than an in-person interview, so I’m glad that that got cleared up during our back-and-forth. As it’s a smaller business, it seems they don’t have an HR person, so this interview was with one of the hiring managers.

I didn’t have a great feel for how my first phone interview went, since I don’t have much interview experience, but I know that this one went really well. It was completely different, and makes the first one look pretty lame by comparison. Even though many of the questions were similar, it felt much more like a conversation than an oral exam (which is how the first one felt). The interviewer, ZC, was super friendly–not in a chummy way, but in a work-colleague way–and this really put me at ease. I think I was better at answering questions because of the rapport. (I’m wondering if perhaps the difference stems from the interviewers’ own relative levels of experience: BA is about my age and has maybe six years’ experience in hiring, while ZC is mid-career, at a senior level, and is clearly very comfortable with the whole process. Then again, it could also just be personality, or company culture.)

Continue reading

My first interview: how it went

I had my phone interview last Friday. I got an email from the HR person, BA, on Tuesday, and we set up a time for a phone call on Friday at 10:00. I spent all day Thursday preparing: I researched the company on their website, read news articles about them, and made a list of potential questions and wrote out my answers. On Friday morning I was all ready, and made sure to put some real clothes on, and do my hair and makeup. Even though BA wouldn’t be able to see me, I knew I’d feel more professional wearing something nicer than my running clothes & sneakers.

BA was about 10 minutes late calling me. Rather than stress me out, the delay made me a lot less nervous. I think it’s because it gave me a chance to truly compose myself and do a little last minute prep. And it goes to show how this is just one small piece of a much bigger picture, both for BA & company and for me.

When she called, I did my best to sound smiley and friendly. I’d thought she might ask me some off-the-wall questions, as this is a tech-related company, and that’s the sort of thing tech companies do. But it turned out to be very straightforward, standard interview questions. Her first question was the standard, “Tell me about yourself.” I did my little spiel, though perhaps a bit more awkwardly than I would have liked. Other questions focused on why I was leaving academia, how I would make the transition, what about this company’s work appealed to me, my weaknesses. And, speaking of weaknesses, this is such a hard question. Not because I don’t have weaknesses, but because I don’t want to sound like I can’t do the job. If I were being honest, I could definitely identify some things that I would need to work on in order to make a successful transition to this type of work. But these are the things you’re not supposed to say; instead, you have to come up with something relatively benign or even unrelated. I thought I’d found a solution by saying that I have a tendency to procrastinate, but that I work well with a deadline in mind, so I always make sure to create a deadline for myself. But apparently procrastination is one of the two or three things you’re not supposed to admit as a weakness, along with misanthropy and being Republican. So while I hope I spun it to my advantage, maybe it was a total faceplant.

Continue reading