Things I’ve been asked in job interviews

In the months since I started my job search, I’ve gotten interviews with about half a dozen companies in London. I haven’t gotten a job offer yet, but I have gotten plenty of unprofessional questions and comments.

“So what do your parents do for a living?”

They root out class-obsessed bigots like you and educate them on appropriate questions to ask in a job interview. It doesn’t pay super well, but tbh they’ve never been in it for the money.

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Starting over, again

It’s been more than three years since I finished my PhD. Almost three years since I last posted here. And just over three years since I entered the post-ac job world. But I feel like I’m back where I started: I’ve left a job that felt familiar and now I’m unemployed in a city where I don’t have much of a network.

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The Case of the Disappearing Phone Interview

Here’s something that happened:

A few weeks ago, I applied for a job with a local nonprofit. The next day, Thursday, at lunchtime, I got an email from HR: “We’d like to schedule a phone interview next week. Please reply and let us know three time slots you have available from Monday to Thursday.” No length of time was specified, so I gave as broad a range as possible – a total of nine hours spread out over two days. I waited all afternoon, but got no response. No response the next day (Friday), either. Since interviews were going to start on Monday, I was a little concerned, but figured it was okay since the days I gave didn’t include Monday. And maybe the HR person was swamped and going to be working over the weekend. So I waited and sent a quick follow-up email on Sunday. Monday morning came and went, and still nothing. At 3:00 I called the HR person (his direct phone number was in his email signature). It went to voice mail, so I left a very polite, brief message. Tuesday came and went; no response. On Wednesday afternoon I called again, and left another brief, polite voice mail. I also sent another follow-up email.

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The entry-level MBA, or, Why I don’t even feel bad about not getting an interview

A few weeks ago, there was a job opening at one of the major performing arts organizations in my city. (I’ll call it the Metropolitan Hand-bell Choir.) I would really like to work for the Metropolitan Hand-bell Choir, and this was an entry-level job that, really, anyone with a brain could do. But it was in the industry that I’d like to work in, which I’ll call TPS reporting, so it was a great match.

It gets better: I have some connections at the Hand-bell Choir. I know one of the ringers in the choir (P.), and I know someone on the administrative side (W.) who works with some of the TPS reporters. And I know another person (S.) who knows the head of the TPS reports department.

Nope, still no job

At the time I wrote my last no-job post, I was feeling really down. Now I’ve moved into a much more distanced and objective state of mind, and I truly wonder how it is that I haven’t even gotten an in-person interview.* The unemployment rate in my metro area is about 1% lower than the national average, and both are declining steadily. We all know a college degree doesn’t count for much anymore, but that’s okay: I have a PhD, which you’d think would at least qualify me for an entry-level position. And for every job I apply for, I know I could do the work. And yet no one is responding to my application materials — or even to recommendations from others, which is the thing that’s definitely supposed to get you in the door. I applied to one job a few weeks ago and had two contacts write to the higher-ups in the organization to recommend me. You’d think that would at least get me a phone screen, but I haven’t heard a word. And this is no giant corporation; it’s a modestly-sized nonprofit.

As I mentioned in my last post, the person we hired at our nonprofit doesn’t know her way around an Excel document, but she has a full-time job. What is it about me, or my resume, or my cover letter, or any combination of factors, that I can’t even get an interview?

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My second phone interview

On Monday I interviewed with a second company. I did the set-up all right this time: asked who I would be interviewing with (ZC), and for how long (about 30 minutes). Incidentally, the admin assistant who was setting this up via email didn’t make it at all clear that it was going to be a phone interview rather than an in-person interview, so I’m glad that that got cleared up during our back-and-forth. As it’s a smaller business, it seems they don’t have an HR person, so this interview was with one of the hiring managers.

I didn’t have a great feel for how my first phone interview went, since I don’t have much interview experience, but I know that this one went really well. It was completely different, and makes the first one look pretty lame by comparison. Even though many of the questions were similar, it felt much more like a conversation than an oral exam (which is how the first one felt). The interviewer, ZC, was super friendly–not in a chummy way, but in a work-colleague way–and this really put me at ease. I think I was better at answering questions because of the rapport. (I’m wondering if perhaps the difference stems from the interviewers’ own relative levels of experience: BA is about my age and has maybe six years’ experience in hiring, while ZC is mid-career, at a senior level, and is clearly very comfortable with the whole process. Then again, it could also just be personality, or company culture.)

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My first interview: how it went

I had my phone interview last Friday. I got an email from the HR person, BA, on Tuesday, and we set up a time for a phone call on Friday at 10:00. I spent all day Thursday preparing: I researched the company on their website, read news articles about them, and made a list of potential questions and wrote out my answers. On Friday morning I was all ready, and made sure to put some real clothes on, and do my hair and makeup. Even though BA wouldn’t be able to see me, I knew I’d feel more professional wearing something nicer than my running clothes & sneakers.

BA was about 10 minutes late calling me. Rather than stress me out, the delay made me a lot less nervous. I think it’s because it gave me a chance to truly compose myself and do a little last minute prep. And it goes to show how this is just one small piece of a much bigger picture, both for BA & company and for me.

When she called, I did my best to sound smiley and friendly. I’d thought she might ask me some off-the-wall questions, as this is a tech-related company, and that’s the sort of thing tech companies do. But it turned out to be very straightforward, standard interview questions. Her first question was the standard, “Tell me about yourself.” I did my little spiel, though perhaps a bit more awkwardly than I would have liked. Other questions focused on why I was leaving academia, how I would make the transition, what about this company’s work appealed to me, my weaknesses. And, speaking of weaknesses, this is such a hard question. Not because I don’t have weaknesses, but because I don’t want to sound like I can’t do the job. If I were being honest, I could definitely identify some things that I would need to work on in order to make a successful transition to this type of work. But these are the things you’re not supposed to say; instead, you have to come up with something relatively benign or even unrelated. I thought I’d found a solution by saying that I have a tendency to procrastinate, but that I work well with a deadline in mind, so I always make sure to create a deadline for myself. But apparently procrastination is one of the two or three things you’re not supposed to admit as a weakness, along with misanthropy and being Republican. So while I hope I spun it to my advantage, maybe it was a total faceplant.

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